Oatmeal Bread Recipe

AuthorSteve Nubie
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Let’s start simple with an artisanal bread recipe that’s easy to make and gives you the look, texture and taste of a true artisan recipe. Rolled oats are the key plus a flour combination of bread flour.

INGREDIENTS:
 3/4 cups of water at 110ºF. /43ºC.
 3/4 cups of milk at 110ºF. /43ºC.
 1 tsp of salt
 1/4 cup of butter at room temperature
 1 tbsp of dark molasses
 1 cup of old-fashioned rolled oats plus extra to top the loaf
 2 1/2 cups of bread flour
 2 1/2 tsp of bread machine yeast
DIRECTIONS:
1

Add the ingredients to the bread pan in the order indicated. Select the basic or white bread setting, 1.5-pound loaf and dark crust setting.

2

When the kneading cycle is complete sprinkle some rolled oats over the top of the dough ball.

3

When the baking cycle is complete remove the loaf from the bread pan and let it rest for 10 minutes. Slice and serve.

Ingredients

INGREDIENTS:
 3/4 cups of water at 110ºF. /43ºC.
 3/4 cups of milk at 110ºF. /43ºC.
 1 tsp of salt
 1/4 cup of butter at room temperature
 1 tbsp of dark molasses
 1 cup of old-fashioned rolled oats plus extra to top the loaf
 2 1/2 cups of bread flour
 2 1/2 tsp of bread machine yeast

Directions

DIRECTIONS:
1

Add the ingredients to the bread pan in the order indicated. Select the basic or white bread setting, 1.5-pound loaf and dark crust setting.

2

When the kneading cycle is complete sprinkle some rolled oats over the top of the dough ball.

3

When the baking cycle is complete remove the loaf from the bread pan and let it rest for 10 minutes. Slice and serve.

Oatmeal Bread Recipe

Steve Nubie

Steve Nubie has been writing professionally for 38 years. He is a Chef and has traveled across Asia and Europe studying language, culture and cuisine. He instructs culinary classes in the Culinary School at the College of DuPage in Glen Ellyn, Illinois and has written extensively on cuisine, cooking, diet and nutrition. He is a published author of 10 books including a cookbook and continues to write on subjects related to culinary trends.

Latest posts by Steve Nubie (see all)

4 Comments
  1. Reply
    Sharon E Walthew August 10, 2018 at 11:09 pm

    Fell 36 minutes to go. Bread flour (new) Yeast (new). Never happens to me. Something is not right w the recipe.

    • Reply
      Admin October 17, 2018 at 7:15 am

      Hmmmm. I’ll rebake and see if I can identify any problems. There is one possibility. A leak in the lid on a bread machine or lifting the lid during the rising and especially the baking cycle could cause a yeast bread to fall. The ingredients all make sense from a recipe and proportion standpoint. I’ll give the recipe another go and see what happens. Sorry you’re having trouble.

      UPDATE: Rebaked and bread rose fine. You might want to check the lid on your bread machine and see if there is an air leak causing a draft to enter. Also, never lift the lid during the rising or baking cycle. Sorry I can’t figure out exactly what happened.

  2. Reply
    Jennifer May 30, 2018 at 3:14 pm

    I made this bread twice. The first time it was slightly caved on the top. I made it again yesterday, up until about 10 minutes before the machine shut off, not only did it cave but actually almost cracked thru the middle!! I followed the recipe to a T, with 1 exception, I used 1/2 top of salt as my husband is salt restricted. What went wrong? I love this bread.
    Thank you

    • Reply
      Admin June 2, 2018 at 7:08 am

      Hi Jennifer,

      There are a few things that can cause a bread to fall or “cave.” The usual problem is a draft of air hitting the loaf during the rising or baking process. The reason for this could be a lid that was not properly closed during the rising or baking process, a defect with the lid on the machine, or someone taking a peek at the bread during the rising or baking process. There could also be a problem with the integrity of the rise. The action that causes a bread to rise is the release of carbon dioxide from the yeast. If the yeast is old or not kept fresh it will not produce enough carbon dioxide to maintain the rise. The easiest way to maintain yeast integrity is to refrigerate it immediately even though it’s typically bought “off-the-shelf” at a grocery store. Yeast is a dormant but living organism and old yeast can be a problem. The only other thought is to use “bread flour” instead of all-purpose flour. Bread flour has more gluten and will produce a more stable and reliable rise.
      We hope this helps!

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