Grinder Rolls Recipe

AuthorSteve Nubie
Rating
ShareSave

If you’re ever run into a Grinder on a menu board in a restaurant, you’re probably wondering what exactly do they grind on this sandwich.  The answer might be a little different that you’d expect.  A Grinder is essentially a Sub sandwich.  It’s also been referred to as a Hoagie.  These kinds of sandwiches were popular with Italian immigrants working in the shipyards on the East coast of the United States.  Most of these men worked as “grinders” grinding off the metal rivets used to bolt ships together.  Somehow or another the name stuck for this style of sandwich.

Grinder rolls are basically used as Sub buns but also are very popular for Italian beef sandwiches, meatball sandwiches and just about anything else people put on a bun.  The recipe is easy, and your bread machine can make kneading the dough easier.  After the dough has risen using the basic dough cycle, the dough is shaped into an elongated bun and allowed to rise a second time before baking in a conventional oven.

INGREDIENTS:
 1 ½ cups of water at 110 degrees Fahrenheit or 43 degrees Celsius
 1 teaspoon of salt
 1 ½ teaspoons of sugar
 4 cups of bread flour
 2 1/4 teaspoons of bread machine yeast or active dry yeast
 1 egg yolk plus 1 teaspoon water whisked for glaze
DIRECTIONS:
1

Put all of the ingredients into the bread pan in to order indicated in the recipe but reserve the egg yolk and water glaze for later. Select the basic dough setting on your bread machine and press start.

2

When the basic dough setting is complete, cut the dough into either 4 or 6 pieces depending on the size of roll you want.

3

Shape the dough pieces into elongated rolls and place on a buttered baking sheet. Glaze the top of the rolls with the egg yolk and water glaze and let rise for 45 minutes. With a sharp knife or serrated knife, cut a long slit in the top of each roll. Let rise for another 15 minutes. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit or 176 degrees Celsius.

4

Bake the rolls on the middle rack in the oven for 30 to 35 minutes until lightly browned on top.

5

Let rest for 5 minutes and serve.

Ingredients

INGREDIENTS:
 1 ½ cups of water at 110 degrees Fahrenheit or 43 degrees Celsius
 1 teaspoon of salt
 1 ½ teaspoons of sugar
 4 cups of bread flour
 2 1/4 teaspoons of bread machine yeast or active dry yeast
 1 egg yolk plus 1 teaspoon water whisked for glaze

Directions

DIRECTIONS:
1

Put all of the ingredients into the bread pan in to order indicated in the recipe but reserve the egg yolk and water glaze for later. Select the basic dough setting on your bread machine and press start.

2

When the basic dough setting is complete, cut the dough into either 4 or 6 pieces depending on the size of roll you want.

3

Shape the dough pieces into elongated rolls and place on a buttered baking sheet. Glaze the top of the rolls with the egg yolk and water glaze and let rise for 45 minutes. With a sharp knife or serrated knife, cut a long slit in the top of each roll. Let rise for another 15 minutes. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit or 176 degrees Celsius.

4

Bake the rolls on the middle rack in the oven for 30 to 35 minutes until lightly browned on top.

5

Let rest for 5 minutes and serve.

Grinder Rolls Recipe

Steve Nubie

Steve Nubie has been writing professionally for 38 years. He is a Chef and has traveled across Asia and Europe studying language, culture and cuisine. He instructs culinary classes in the Culinary School at the College of DuPage in Glen Ellyn, Illinois and has written extensively on cuisine, cooking, diet and nutrition. He is a published author of 10 books including a cookbook and continues to write on subjects related to culinary trends.

Latest posts by Steve Nubie (see all)

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

Leave a reply

Join our Community Now!

GET THIS RECIPE NOW!

We are giving away an exclusive coupon to our first 500 subscribers for our new upcoming bread machine recipe book!
APPLY
*We promise not to send any spam and not more than one email per week
close-link