Jellies and Jams Recipes from Your Bread Machine

Some people don’t know they can make jelly, jams and preserves in their bread machine. Here are some of the most popular recipes.

Strawberry Jam

You may have noticed that your bread machine has a setting referred to as “Jam or Jelly.” This isn’t about making jelly rolls, it’s about making jams, jellies and preserves that you will ultimately pour into a jar for storage in your refrigerator or pantry.

The difference between a jelly, jam and preserve is simple. A jelly is usually made from the juice of a fruit with gelatin or pectin added along with sugar. A jam is made from whole fruit pureed to a juicy texture. A preserve is a jam that has also been made from the whole fruit, chopped and blended – but tends to have chunks of the fruit in the jam.

 

Storing Your Jams and Jellies

Storage in the refrigerator is the preferred way to store these homemade jellies because the low temperature gives the jam or jelly a firmer consistency. That’s one of the things you’ll notice about many jams and jellies made in your bread machine. They don’t always have the viscosity or thickness that jams made on the stovetop often have. This is because stovetop preparation causes some of the liquid to evaporate which thickens the consistency of the jam or jelly. Bread machines reach a high heat but little evaporation takes place, so you may find it to be a touch runny unless you refrigerate it.

If you intend to store your jams, jellies or preserves in a pantry make sure you process the jars first. You can do a basic processing by immersing the jars in boiling water for at least 10 minutes. This is important because the sugar in jams and jellies can encourage the growth of bacteria unless it has been processed in the boiling water bath.

 

Pay Attention to the Details

blueberry-jam

Like many recipes related to baking, accurate and precise measurements are critical to success. One thing to keep in mind is that all measures for fruit are for coarsely chopped or diced fruit. Eventually you’ll mash the fruit a bit with a potato masher or in a food processor. This will reduce the total cups but that’s okay. Just make sure you stay true to the cup measures with chunks of fruit before you mash or process them.

All of the recipes call for the addition of sugar and some call for the addition of pectin or gelatin as well. Pectin is a thickening agent used for many jams, jellies and preserves. It’s best to find a low sugar or no sugar pectin. You’ll be adding sugar as part of the recipe and you don’t want too much sugar when making bread machine jellies.

 

Before You Start

It’s very important that you only make jam or jelly in a bread machine that has the specific and unique “Jam or Jelly” setting. The operation of the paddle and the temperature settings are unique for jams and jellies and it’s difficult to improvise with any other setting.

Equally important is the integrity of the bread pan. Bread machines with the jam and jelly feature have bread pans that have a unique bearing under the kneading paddle. This prevents any liquids from leaking through the paddle bearing and into the machine. You can ruin your machine or at least face an imposing cleanup task if a pan full of fruit juice and sugar leak into the bottom of your bread machine. You also could short it out if the liquids encounter any electrical connections.

Even if your bread machine has the “Jam and Jelly” setting you might want to test your bread pan. Simply pour a couple of cups of water in the pan and let it sit on the kitchen counter. After about 20 minutes lift the pan and see if any water has leaked onto the countertop. This can happen with older machines. We often get away with it because the kneading process usually starts within seconds after we put the pan into the machine, and the incorporation of the dry ingredients prevent any leakage.

 

This Stuff Can Be Hot, Hot, Hot!

A note of caution. Be very careful when handling the finished jam or jelly. In fact, you should probably let it rest in the machine for about 30 minutes with the lid open when the cycle is complete. If you’re nervous about any leakage remove the pan while wearing heavy duty kitchen gloves or pot-holders. Heated sugar is extremely hot and can cause 3rd degree burns. Generally, making jam or jelly in a bread machines is safer than making it on the stovetop, but always exercise caution when handling any hot, sugar liquid or syrup.

If you find your jam or jelly is still a bit runny after refrigeration you can try adding a little more pectin or reducing the amount of fruit or juice. You can also think of it as a unique syrup for waffles or pancakes.

 

Selecting the Right Fruit or Juice

The ripeness of any fruit is very important. You don’t want fruits that are not ripe or too ripe. They need to be “just right”. This is fairly simple with strawberries and other berries, but can be a challenge with mangoes, kiwi fruit and peaches. If the fruit you have on hand doesn’t feel ripe, consider making a different flavor or wait a few days and bake a loaf of bread instead. You also should only use fruit juice that is 100% juice. Too many fruit juices have added water and sugar. This can compromise your result so stick with 100% juice. Pectin or gelatin is also important when juice is the main ingredient. Pectin or gelatin are optional with many of the recipes listed below, but it’s typically required when you’re only using juice.

 

Preserve Your Jam or Jelly

Without sterilizing the jar – it will last up to 4 weeks in your fridge.
There are two ways to process canned or “jarred” foods in a hot water bath.  One is simply immersing the jars in boiling water for a minimum of 10 minutes.  The other involves immersing the jars in boiling water in a pressure cooker for 10 minutes or more.  In the vernacular of food processing this is referred to as a “hot water bath.”  This assumes the jars and lids are also sterilized in boiling water.

The reason there are two processing approaches has to do with the PH of the food.  Fruits, tomatoes and other acidic foods can be processed in boiling water.  Alkaline foods like meats, beans or potatoes require the added heat and pressure of a pressure cooker.  I’ve processed canned foods for years and could easily write an article about it to accompany the jams and jelly recipes and articles if you’d like.

 

Want More?

You may look at the recipes that follow and think “I’d like to make more than just a jar of jelly.” Be careful out there. Typically you don’t want to exceed 3 to 4 cups of jam or jelly at a time when you’re using a bread machine for preparation. If you want to make a lot of jelly you should probably consider some traditional, stovetop methods. However, many of the bread machine recipes for jams, jellies and preserves are so simple you could certainly make multiple batches over the course of a day. Just don’t succumb to the temptation to overfill your pan and risk a spill into your machine, or a bad burn.

 

Recipes:

(All recipes make about 3 to 4 cups of finished jam, jelly or preserves)

Blueberry Jam Recipe:

3 - blueberry jam - blueberries 3 - blueberry jam beauty shot

Ingredients:

  • 5 cups blueberries – fresh or frozen or combination
  • 2 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp low sugar or no sugar pectin (optional)

Mash the fruit with a potato masher or in a food processor. In a bowl, mix in the sugar and pour the mixture into the bread pan. Select Jam or jelly setting and begin the cycle. When done, lift the lid of the machine and let cool for 30 minutes or remove carefully and let cool on a heat resistant trivet or surface. Pour or spoon carefully into jar or jars and let rest for 3 hours. Refrigerate and serve. Keeps in the fridge for up to 4 weeks.

7 - blueberry jam beauty shot 2 - blueberry jam beauty shot

Peach Jam Recipe:

2 - peach jelly - peaches 4 - peach jelly - finished peach jelly in the pan

3 - peach jelly beauty shot 4 - peach jelly beauty shot

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 pounds or 4 cups of ripe, peaches, peeled, halved, and pitted, Can also be frozen peaches or fresh and frozen blended with canned.
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp low sugar or no sugar pectin (optional)

Directions:

Make sure the peaches are ripe. Mash the fruit with a potato masher or in a food processor. In a bowl, mix in the sugar and pour the mixture into the bread pan. Select Jam or jelly setting and begin the cycle. When done, lift the lid of the machine and let cool for 30 minutes or remove carefully and let cool on a heat resistant trivet or surface. Pour or spoon carefully into jar or jars and let rest for 3 hours. Refrigerate and serve. Keeps in the fridge for up to 4 weeks.

1 - peach jelly - beauty shot

Grape Jelly Recipe:

7- grape jelly 3 - grape jelly

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups grape juice (100%)
  • 2 envelopes Knox Gelatin
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice

Directions:

Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl and stir until gelatin and sugar are dissolved. Pour into bread pan and insert pan into the bread machine. Select “Jam or Jelly” setting. When done, lift the lid of the machine and let cool for 30 minutes or remove carefully and let cool on a heat resistant trivet or surface. Pour or spoon carefully into jar or jars and let rest for 3 hours. Refrigerate and serve. Keeps in the fridge for up to 4 weeks.

10 - grape jelly 1 - grape jelly

CrabApple Jelly Recipe:

1 crabapple jelly - crabapples on tree 2 - crabapple jelly - crabapple in bowl

1 - crab apples and water in blender 4 - crab apple juice getting strained

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups Crabapple Juice
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 envelopes Knox Gelatin

Directions:

If you have a juicer you can drop the whole crabapples into the juicer and continue to juice until you have 4 cups. If you don’t have a juicer you can put the whole crabapples into a blender with a little water and continue to blend and strain through a fine mesh strainer until you have 4 cups.

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and stir until sugar and gelatin are dissolved. Pour into bread pan and select “Jam and Jelly” setting. When done remove with oven mitt and let cool 30 minutes. Pour into jar or bowl and refrigerate. Keeps for 4 weeks.

7 - strained crab apple cider 8 - crab apple jelly

9 - crab apple jelly

Mulberry Jam Recipe:

2- mulberry jelly - mulberries on tree 4 mulberry jelly

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups of mulberries
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 2 enveloped Knox Gelatin

Directions:

Mulberries grow on trees and are fairly common. If you have a mulberry tree, why not make some jelly. In a food processor combine sugar, mulberries and gelatin and blend until smooth. Add to bread pan and select jam and jelly course. When done remove carefully and let cool for 30 minutes. Pour into jar or bowl and refrigerate.

2 mulberry jelly

Apricot Jam Recipe:

1 - apricot jelly - fresh apricots 3 - apricot jelly

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 pounds ripe, but firm, apricots, peeled, halved, and pitted
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp low sugar or no sugar pectin (optional)

Directions:

Here again, ripeness is very important. Mash the fruit with a potato masher or in a food processor. In a bowl, mix in the sugar and pour the mixture into the bread pan. Select Jam or jelly setting and begin the cycle. When done, lift the lid of the machine and let cool for 30 minutes or remove carefully and let cool on a heat resistant trivet or surface. Pour or spoon carefully into jar or jars and let rest for 3 hours. Refrigerate and serve. Keeps in the fridge for up to 4 weeks.

4 - apricot jelly 2 - Apricot jelly

Strawberry Jam Recipe:

Strawberry jam on bread

Ingredients:

  • 4 pints (8 cups) (about 2 pounds) strawberries
  • 3 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp low sugar or no sugar pectin (optional)

Directions:

Cut off any green spots or unripe areas of the strawberries. Over ripe strawberries are okay. Mash the fruit with a potato masher or in a food processor. In a bowl, mix in the sugar and pour the mixture into the bread pan. Select Jam or jelly setting and begin the cycle. When done, lift the lid of the machine and let cool for 30 minutes or remove carefully and let cool on a heat resistant trivet or surface. Pour or spoon carefully into jar or jars and let rest for 3 hours. Refrigerate and serve. Keeps in the fridge for up to 4 weeks.

Blackberry Jam Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 5 cups blackberries
  • 2 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp low sugar or no sugar pectin (optional)

Directions:

Like most berries, they can be fresh or frozen. Mash the fruit with a potato masher or in a food processor. In a bowl, mix in the sugar and pour the mixture into the bread pan. Select Jam or jelly setting and begin the cycle. When done, lift the lid of the machine and let cool for 30 minutes or remove carefully and let cool on a heat resistant trivet or surface. Pour or spoon carefully into jar or jars and let rest for 3 hours. Refrigerate and serve. Keeps in the fridge for up to 4 weeks.

Raspberry Jam Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups (1 1/2 pounds) (about 4 half pints fresh) raspberries
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp low sugar or no sugar pectin (optional)

Directions:

Mash the fruit with a potato masher or in a food processor. In a bowl, mix in the sugar and pour the mixture into the bread pan. Select Jam or jelly setting and begin the cycle. When done, lift the lid of the machine and let cool for 30 minutes or remove carefully and let cool on a heat resistant trivet or surface. Pour or spoon carefully into jar or jars and let rest for 3 hours. Refrigerate and serve. Keeps in the fridge for up to 4 weeks.

Conclusion

I think you get the idea. The recipes are very simple but keep an eye on the portions and the ripeness of the fruit. Consider pectin as an option if you find your jams or jellies need a little firmness. Remember to be careful with the hot jelly and it’s best if stored in the fridge. Hopefully you find success and maybe explore some fruit combinations as you continue to make your own jams and jellies for all of the great breads you bake.

Check out the best bread makers available!

Steve Nubie

Steve Nubie has been writing professionally for 38 years. He is a Chef and has traveled across Asia and Europe studying language, culture and cuisine. He instructs culinary classes in the Culinary School at the College of DuPage in Glen Ellyn, Illinois and has written extensively on cuisine, cooking, diet and nutrition. He is a published author of 10 books including a cookbook and continues to write on subjects related to culinary trends.

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26 Comments
  1. Reply
    Liz August 14, 2017 at 8:25 pm

    The recipe for plum jam on my Panasonic bread maker says to use half the amount of sugar to plums. Would this be ok? Other recipes I have found say to use equal sugar to fruit?

    • Reply
      Steve Nubie August 20, 2017 at 9:03 pm

      Hi Liz, I’m not sure that cutting the sugar in half is a good idea and it has nothing to do with sweetness. Sugar and heat are two of the things that help a liquid or fruit to gel into a jelly or jam upon cooling. If the recipe also calls for the addition of pectin, that would compensate for less sugar. If it doesn’t you might end up with plum syrup.

  2. Reply
    ASulli August 2, 2017 at 5:35 am

    Very greatful for the recipes! only thing I am wondering is how much does each recipe make?how many jars will be needs?

    • Reply
      Admin August 6, 2017 at 4:04 pm

      Hi!

      About 3 to 4 8-ounce jars would be the right amount.

  3. Reply
    David Barker July 10, 2017 at 6:19 pm

    What about cherry jam?

    • Reply
      Steve Nubie July 11, 2017 at 12:45 pm

      Hi David,

      You can make cherry jam.
      The cherries need to be pitted and chopped in a food processor or blender. You could also reduce them to cherry juice in a juicer or strain after using the food processor or blender. The best recipe would be any recipe for berries like blueberries or strawberries. You may need to add some pectin (Knox gelatin) to help firm up the jam or jelly which is a standard addition to any jam or jelly made with juice.

  4. Reply
    Beulah July 8, 2017 at 5:39 am

    I dont want to use sugar? Can I use honey or something else instead?

    • Reply
      Steve Nubie July 9, 2017 at 8:19 pm

      Hi,

      Yes you can substitute honey for sugar in a jam or jelly recipe in your bread machine, but here are a few things you need to be aware of. For one, natural sugar has certain gelling or setting properties when brought to the proper temperature. This helps the jam or jelly to set and create a firm texture. Honey lacks some of these properties. There are two solutions. One is to use fruits high in natural pectin. Pectin is a thickening agent that creates a gel. These fruits include: Peaches, apples, oranges, grapefruit and apricots contain the highest amount of pectin among fruits. For example, one small peach contains 0.91 gram of pectin, while 1 cup of apple slices contains 0.654 gram of pectin.

      Another thing to consider is addition of pectin from a store-bought source. A common brand name for this type of product is “Know gelatin.” I would add a package to any jam or jelly recipe made with honey and you may find you need to add two. You’ll have to experiment but don’t be surprised if your first effort results in a syrup. In that case, enjoy the syrup on some pancakes and try, try again. (-:

  5. Reply
    elizabeth simpson June 20, 2017 at 3:56 am

    i have a panasonic bread maker it hasent got a jam setting button what setting do i need for making jam

    • Reply
      Steve Nubie June 23, 2017 at 9:46 am

      Hello Elizabeth,

      Good news and bad news if you want to make a jam or jelly and don’t have a jam or jelly setting on your bread machine. The good news is you can use the basic white bread setting to mix, mash and start your jam or jelly.
      The bad news is that the jam and jelly setting on bread machines gets to a higher temperature than any other setting on the machine. The setting also maintains the heat longer. The high heat is necessary to allow the sugar, gelatin or pectin and the natural pectin in fruit to sufficiently gel when chilled.

      Our recommendation is that you try it with the white bread setting and pour the jam or jelly into sterilized jars, cap, let them rest at room temperature for an hour and refrigerate. You may get lucky and have a nicely gelled jam or jelly or you may end up with a fruit syrup. That would be really good on pancakes or waffles, but it may not be what you want. If you have success it’s probably due to higher amounts of natural pectin in certain fruits. If you don’t have success there are a couple of alternatives

      You could start the white bread setting again and run it for a second time. Unfortunately that would take about 7 hours to run the basic white setting twice.

      The best solution is to take the fruit syrup either directly from the bread machine or from your jelly jars and pour it into a saucepan and heat it over medium-high heat until it comes to a boil. You have to stir constantly. Once it starts to boil reduce it to medium to medium-low heat. You want the bubbling to continue, but if it becomes robust you could get burned. Sugar in anything makes everything extremely hot. After 5 minutes of gentle boiling and constant stirring, remove the saucepan to a cold burner and let it rest for 5 minutes. Pour it back into sterilized canning jars and seal, let rest at room temperature for an hour and refrigerate. You should have a better result and a consistency more like the jam or jelly you want.

      One thing to keep in mind you do anything like running a setting or finish on the stovetop, you should try the basic white bread setting; jar the jelly or jam and assess the result after refrigeration.

      Hope this helps
      Thanks,
      Steve

  6. Reply
    Jo L May 19, 2017 at 2:19 pm

    can I freeze the jelly or jam that I make?

    • Reply
      Admin May 23, 2017 at 3:22 pm

      Hi, yes you can!

  7. Reply
    Tricia March 9, 2017 at 4:59 am

    I have purchased Jam Sugar, is this ok to use in these recipes?

    • Reply
      Admin March 21, 2017 at 1:27 am

      Hi Tricia,

      Yes, jam sugar is fine

  8. Reply
    Julie Dawson January 25, 2017 at 2:06 am

    Hi I have lots of homegrown tomatoes and basil. I wonder if I could make tomato and basil jam (preserve) in my bread maker

    • Reply
      ASulli August 2, 2017 at 5:37 am

      Good question will also try-!!!

    • Reply
      Admin February 4, 2017 at 3:25 pm

      Hi Julie!
      Sorry for the late response –

      All you would have to do is blend the tomatoes and the basil and substitute for other fruits in the same proportion.

  9. Reply
    Deb November 17, 2016 at 9:20 am

    Can the bread machine be used to make preserves with the jam/jelly setting? If it can, does anyone have a recipe for tomato preserves?

  10. Reply
    Liz October 10, 2016 at 6:26 am

    Can i ask why all these jam’s only last for up to 4 weeks in the fridge?
    As in the past when making jam on the gas top, they last for months without going in the fridge.

    • Reply
      Admin October 11, 2016 at 3:52 pm

      The 4 weeks is the safe shelf life for an unprocessed jam or jelly. If the jelly is processed in a hot water bath in sterilized jars the shelf life could be up to 6 months

  11. Reply
    ruby stephenson September 7, 2016 at 4:25 pm

    i have a oster bread machine and it has makiing jams and jellies on the front of the machine but i cant find the setting on the top for it

  12. Reply
    Luxurio August 17, 2016 at 4:21 pm

    Hi, I was wondering if if I use juice to make jelly in the breadmaker, should I reduce it first to get a thicker consistency? Great article by the way, it was really helpful.

    • Reply
      Steve Nubie October 1, 2016 at 8:57 pm

      No need to reduce the juice. The sugar and the recipe make it all work.

  13. Reply
    Anna March 28, 2016 at 8:55 am

    Can this be done by water bath canning method? I’d like to be able to ship this this across the country.

    • Reply
      Steve Nubie March 29, 2016 at 9:53 am

      Hi Anna,

      Jelly made in the bread machine can be jarred and processed in a water-bath. Check canning timetables on the Internet for jams and jellies to determine the proper amount of time.

      Steve.

  14. Reply
    dawn g September 13, 2015 at 8:17 pm

    how do you make grape jam in the bread machine with Real Grapes ? thank you

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